Tips for upgrading your logo

With talent, expertise, and abundant charm, Kate Hart had established a real estate staging business that might have satisfied a less ambitious person. She was determined to take her company to a higher level. Suddenly the clip art logo and homemade promotional materials that served adequately during her startup phase seemed far too unsophisticated. She came to Hollister for an image upgrade.

In creating a new identity for Hart & Associates, we followed a few simple rules:

  1. Convey the company’s style and, when possible, its core business. Though cool and sophisticated, the Hart icon represents a warm idea of home: two chairs in an enclosed space. The chairs face each other, suggesting two people talking face-to-face, as would a client and a designer. Finally, each chair is an “h,” for Hart.
  2. Keep the icon simple. A logo should work well at a small size, and work in black and white as well as color. An intricate logo that looks nice enlarged on the cover of a folder may look like an inkblot on a business card.
  3. Make the business name part of the logo. Until your logo is as recognizable as Apple’s or Nike’s, you’ll need to introduce yourself by name.

 

Hart & Associates new logo
Hart & Associates old logo